We’ve been…

…growing heirloom tomatoes

…learning about roots

…making ghee (clarified butter)

vrindavan farm, local cows, clarified butter, ghee

…grazing and milking our growing family of cows

…making our own packaging from supari (betel) tree leaves

…fermenting edibles from the zen garden!

…expanding our heirloom tomato collection

 

…sourcing produce from other farmers to encourage their good practices and get them better value for their work

 

What’s on the horizon? … Bees! We hope to home the hardworking-pollinating-honey-making-compound-eyed ones soon.

Where we’ve been…

The torrential rains of the monsoon allow us a bit of a breather on the land. Mother nature waters, we sit back, eat cukes, harvest, and work minimally not letting the jungle overtake. Post monsoon, we get busy. A quick rendition…

Members – two new members have joined us on the land. In India, the cow is synonymous with the mother and considered a Goddess (Devi). Sure, the cow gives milk, but for a grower, she shits and pees all over the land. We’ve willed their presence for some years now and are stoked to be joined by these two gorgeous ladies, with their massive strength and gentle presence.

Sows – while the monsoons have stretched over  by a month, we can’t pass up a sow period. We kickstarted the year with heirloom tomatoes (adding 3 new varieties to the collection from last), cucumbers (1 heirloom variety and another indigenous one), gourds (several local varieties). In store next are chillis, brinjal, radish, microgreens, and a host of weirdly coloured heirloom veggie seeds we got our hands on!

toms

Ingredients – always foraging for food off the land. Sure, we grow, but what does the forest have for us?! This year, we were introduced to a whole list of indigenous monsoon vegs, also bamboo shoots, and we received some delightful mushroom harvests!

Ferments – our ferment continues to brew, feed for the soil, bubbling with life as we continually add new ingredients off the land

Harvests – harvests have included gourds, herbs, pumpkins, and flowers

Making Friends and Foes – as we ogle at the beauty and variety of nature’s creation, and delve into what role they play on the land… well, we make some friends and some foes. For the burrower, our til is kept to a mimimum. And the hornworm in all it’s beauty, does feed off our saplings and is now fed to the fish.

Spreading the knowledge – our goal is to see all growers evolve to clean practices. This year, we have begun work on PurnaMadhuVan, a plot of land around the bend from us, committed to growing clean and nutritious food. Here, starting from the blank slate, we sowed fruit trees for future generations, herbs for a couple years down, shared with them several of our saplings, and shared with you their bitter gourd and pumpkin.

And now, it’s back to the land.

Forest Foods

The monsoons, the earth births all seed that until now sat in potential, including a variety of edibles… kaodi sabzi, kadu kand, mahua, and more.  The forests leave no man hungry.  The knowledge too exists.  The lands we’re willing to leave wild though, these are the lands where one can find the most nutritious foods.

The Mango Chronicles

This Spring left many growers wondering about their mango crop. Rains from the year prior hadn’t given the trees their fill. As we commenced harvests though, nature showed, yet again, she had plenty to offer.

For us, the season carries a short, intense, and sweet high. This year we brought nearly 3000 kilos of the sweet one to the city. Over the span of 3 weeks, you shared it with friends, family, loved ones. The stories, as always, kept us going… The lady who checked-in on mangoes in March, refusing to buy any for her mum until ours were ready 2 months later. The friend whose baby weaned with mango, gleaming eyes and mango-stained grinning face. Sundays that the boys joined us to unload crates, ending up more busy feeding crows baby mango. The even younger, whom, overwhelmed, gathered more mangoes than their arms could hold, dropping one each time they added another to their bounty, to leave only after putting the mangoes to sleep in their bed of hay. The principal who continues to share the fruit with all that cross her path, her job she says, is to spread the sweetness – we think she adds in her own. The flower seller on the street who shared the year before story, “didi, gaye saal mein itna aam tha, humne gaon leke sabh baccho ko khilaya” (sister, last year there was so much mango, we took it to our village and fed all the kids). The lady who, out of the ICU, is healing herself with mango. The gentleman, who starts his family’s morning with a mango smoothie preparation… he peels each mango with his hands. You all echoed the simple bottom line.. We’ve had much mango this season, but these… They’re something else.

We learned actions do create waves. Each year we share produce with kids on the streets, one kiddo summing it up, “didi, aam sabh ko milna chahiye na” (sister, everyone should get mango no) This year we learned of other mango santas in our area! So, we found new hands to share with… families living under obscure bridges, rag gatherers, pan/bidi sellers, mogra girls, drug rehab boys.In their being, I was reminded of Hapus’ seductive aroma and flavour, Kesar’s nonchalance being second in name, Batli’s nonfibrous, firm and bold presence. Totapuri, whose sweet and sour remains sought out by a few. The Dasseri, small and unobtrusive, but carrying its own. The Rajapuri, who continues its reign as the juice-giant. And the Sindhu, with it’s end-season presence, leaving us with an intensely sweet lingering mouthful.
Thanks for being a part of our season. And as our jedi mascot seems to say… May The Sweet Force be with You.
mango, mango season, organic, farm, vrindavan, natural, summer, fruit

May the Sweet Force be with You